Christmas is supposed to be a festive time of year, a celebration of hope and joy as winter closes in.

At a university in Chicago, however, Muslim students are now protesting that the college is too festive, and Christmas celebrations are overshadowing Islam.

To make the complaint even more bizarre, this objection is happening at Loyola University — a private Catholic school.

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Yes, Muslims who willingly enrolled at an obviously Christian school are now upset to find out that… er… it actually celebrates Christmas.

A student journalist named Sajedah Al-khzaleh is one of the voices fanning the outrage. She wrote a piece in the campus newspaper essentially complaining that Islamic Ramadan and Eid celebrations just aren’t as popular as Christmas. In Chicago. At a Catholic university.

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“Religious holidays aren’t represented equally on campus,” declared the headline of her article.

It must be pointed out that based on numbers provided by Campus Reform, Muslims make up only about 5 percent of the university’s students. In other words, Al-khzaleh thinks “equally” is not “proportionally.”

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This a bit like claiming that Muslims should be half of all football players or half of all movie stars, despite the fact that they are only 1 percent of the entire U.S. population. That’s not how “equally” actually works.

Imagine Christians voluntarily choosing to attend a Muslim school in Libya, and then demanding that Easter be celebrated like Ramadan. Or American students moving to Egypt, only to complain that Independence Day isn’t celebrated on July 4 in Cairo.

“Eid [at Loyola] is a bit dampened just because you have to go about your normal routine along with Eid,” a student named Sajid Ahmed told the school paper.

“At home it’d be a big family thing, dress up and go to the mosque. We’d spend the day together and celebrate … compared to that, college Eid has been less.”

Perhaps he didn’t read the brochure.

“I think if the leadership is exposed to the Muslim voice, the voice who wants to make campus more festive for other holidays, I think that’s definitely one step,” Ahmed insisted.

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Representatives of the university were quick to point out that there is nothing preventing Muslim students — or students of any other minority religion — from celebrating their holidays or traditions.

“We feel that we do a good job at the student center of allowing other faiths to [join the holiday season],” student complex associate director Bryan Goodwin told the school paper. “We pride ourselves on wanting to make sure we’re aware. We always lend ourselves the conversation.”

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Goodwin said that the Muslim Student Association hadn’t even proposed any alternative decorations or events.

Even Muslim students begrudgingly admitted that they felt welcomed at the university, and the festive holiday spirit wasn’t exclusionary.

“It’s contagious happiness,” Ahmed said. “I don’t celebrate Christmas itself, but I respect that this is a time of happiness for people, so I enjoy it, too.”

One has to wonder what the problem is, then. It seems like some people just want to complain.